And so the thesis writing begins

After nearly three years of research, I have started the long and arduous process of writing up. I am going to use LaTeX to compile my writing, mainly because it makes it easier to make beautiful looking documents. Also word processing packages have a nasty habit of corrupting the formatting, and make numbering of equations difficult.

In January I pulled together my notes and various bits of writing into a first semblance of a structure. I had started most of the writing in Word, but using the LibreOffice export plugin I have mentioned previously, I was able to convert this to basic LaTeX fairly easily. I have since added in plots from MATLAB, which I had been avoiding inserting into Word, as it doesn’t handle images in a sensible vector format (e.g. SVG, EPS, PDF).

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Overdue update on research progress

I realise that I’m very much overdue an update on my research progress, having posted very little so far and nothing in the last year.

Things are generally going well, although I still feel there is a lot to do and only a limited amount of time to do it in. This feeling of pressure is probably due to my colleague Sam, who is a year ahead of me in the IDCORE programme, frantically trying to get his thesis finished off this week. I know that I don’t need to be at the same stage as him — that I have 12 months of funding left — and that I am fairly well advanced with my research. But that doesn’t stop the nagging feeling of not having enough time left.

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First research outputs

I have been working towards the first outputs from my research, which will be at a couple of academic conferences this year. Firstly, I will be presenting a poster at the European Geosciences Union General Assembly 2015 in Vienna, on the work we have been doing on “Wave-current interactions at the FloWave Ocean Energy Research Facility”. … Read more

Taught component over, now onto the research

Nearly six months ago, I finished the taught component of my EngD, and moved on to the research phase. My project is looking at physical scale modelling of offshore renewable energy devices in the new FloWave facility at the University of Edinburgh. This is claimed to be the world’s most advanced ocean simulator, a 25m diameter circular wave tank that can also create currents to simulate the tides, and can produce waves and current in any direction.

FloWave

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