My Thesis: Combined wave-current scale model testing at FloWave

Somewhat belatedly, I’m posting a summary of my thesis on this blog. I’ve copied both the lay summary to explain the work in more general terms, together with the more technical abstract of my thesis.

Somewhat belatedly, I’m posting a summary of my thesis on this blog, to summarise what I spent over 3 years of my life working on. I think after finishing my corrections I had had enough of writing for a while. I also started my new post at the university around the same time, so was busy with that, and somewhat lost interest in this site.  I’ve copied below both the lay summary to explain the work in more general terms, together with the more technical abstract of my thesis. If you are really interested,  the full thesis is available in the Edinburgh Research Archive. Continue reading “My Thesis: Combined wave-current scale model testing at FloWave”

Numbers for 2017

With the Earth having completed another billion kilometre long orbit around our sun, and our arbitrary calendar changing year, it’s time for my annual look back at the numbers of the previous year. I took nearly 11k photos, and walked 4.5 million steps covering almost 3600 km. This analysis is probably mainly of interest to me, but I am sharing it anyway.

Continue reading “Numbers for 2017”

Design diagrams for wavelength discrepancy in tank testing with inconsistently scaled intermediate water depth

The title or this paper is a bit of a mouthful, but actually it covers a relatively simple subject: the errors that may arise if the water depth is not scaled consistently with other parameters when tank testing devices, particularly those designed to harness power from waves. Continue reading “Design diagrams for wavelength discrepancy in tank testing with inconsistently scaled intermediate water depth”

My Publications

A list of all my academic publications, with links to those I have summarised on this site, plus the full text online.

  • Noble, D R; Draycott, S; Nambiar, A; Sellar, B G; Steynor, J; Kiprakis, A (2020) Experimental Assessment of Flow, Performance, and Loads for Tidal Turbines in a Closely-Spaced ArrayEnergies. 10.3390/en13081977.
    • Noble, D R; Draycott, S; Nambiar, A; Sellar, B; Steynor, J; Lennon, M; Davey, T; Kiprakis, A. (2020). Flow data around three Supergen UKCMER Tidal Turbines in a closely spaced staggered array at FloWave, [dataset]. The University of Edinburgh. School of Engineering. Institute for Energy Systems. 10.7488/ds/2762.
    • Noble, D R; Draycott, S; Nambiar, A; Sellar, B; Steynor, J; Lennon, M; Davey, T; Kiprakis, A. (2020). Turbine loading and performance data for three Supergen UKCMER Tidal Turbines in a closely spaced staggered array at FloWave, [dataset]. The University of Edinburgh. School of Engineering. Institute for Energy Systems. 10.7488/ds/2761.
  • Draycott, S; Sellar, B; Davey, T; Noble, D R; Venugopal, V;  Ingram, D M (2019) Capture and simulation of the ocean environment for offshore renewable energyRenewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews 10.1016/j.rser.2019.01.011.
  • Draycott, S; Payne, G S; Steynor, J; Nambiar, A; Sellar, B; Davey, T; Noble, D R; Venugopal, V. (2019) Environmental & Load Data: 1:15 Scale Tidal Turbine subject to a variety of Regular Wave Conditions. Data in Brief 10.1016/j.dib.2019.103732.
  • Noble, D R (2018) Combined wave-current scale model testing at FloWave. EngD Thesis, The University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh. http://hdl.handle.net/1842/31170.
  • Draycott, S, Noble, D R, Davey, T A D, Bruce, T, Ingram, D M, Johanning, L, Smith, H C M, Day, A H and Kaklis, P (2017) Re-creation of site-specific multi-directional waves with non-collinear current. Ocean Engineering10.1016/j.oceaneng.2017.10.047. Read my summary of this work.
  • Noble, D R, Draycott, S, Davey, T A D, & Bruce, T (2017) Design diagrams for wavelength discrepancy in tank testing with inconsistently scaled intermediate water depth. International Journal of Marine Energy. 10.1016/j.ijome.2017.04.001. Read a summary on this site.
  • Noble, D R, Draycott, S, Davey, T A D, & Bruce, T (2017) Testing marine renewable energy devices in an advanced multi-directional combined wave-current environment, Proceedings of the ASME 36th International Conference on Ocean, Offshore and Arctic Engineering (OMAE2017), Trondheim, Norway. 10.1115/OMAE2017-62052.
  • Sutherland, D R J, Noble, D R, Steynor, J, Davey, T A D, & Bruce, T (2017) Characterisation of Current and Turbulence in the FloWave Ocean Energy Research Facility. Ocean Engineering. 10.1016/j.oceaneng.2017.02.028.
  • Noble D, Davey T, Smith H, Kaklis P, Robinson A, and Bruce T (2015) Spatial Variation of Currents Generated in the FloWave Ocean Energy Research FacilityProceedings of the 11th European Wave and Tidal Energy Conference (EWTEC2015), Nantes, France. (Research Gate)

Re-creation of site-specific multi-directional waves with non-collinear current

This paper was published in the Ocean Engineering journal in October 2017. It was a joint piece of work with fellow IDCORE researcher at FloWave, Sam Draycott, building on our separate areas of research. In it, we demonstrate the capability of the FloWave facility to generate complex wave-current conditions, and also highlight the importance of considering even relatively low tidal currents when testing wave-energy devices. Continue reading “Re-creation of site-specific multi-directional waves with non-collinear current”

More on writing my thesis with LaTex

As I mentioned previously, I am writing my thesis using the LaTeX markup system, and thought I would put together a few words on my experience and things I have found. This includes formatting tables, including acronyms, and larger landscape figures/tables. I am sure there are many other ways to to achieve the same result, but these are the ones I have found to work.

Continue reading “More on writing my thesis with LaTex”

And so the thesis writing begins

After nearly three years of research, I have started the long and arduous process of writing up. I am going to use LaTeX to compile my writing, mainly because it makes it easier to make beautiful looking documents. Also word processing packages have a nasty habit of corrupting the formatting, and make numbering of equations difficult.

In January I pulled together my notes and various bits of writing into a first semblance of a structure. I had started most of the writing in Word, but using the LibreOffice export plugin I have mentioned previously, I was able to convert this to basic LaTeX fairly easily. I have since added in plots from MATLAB, which I had been avoiding inserting into Word, as it doesn’t handle images in a sensible vector format (e.g. SVG, EPS, PDF). Continue reading “And so the thesis writing begins”

2016 in numbers

With the new year upon use, time for my annual analysis of the year just past. I’ve continued logging my physical activity and travel, with a few more categories. In 2016 I took approximately 4.5 million steps, covering over 3 000 km, and I cycled a further 1 300 km. Continuing the trend from my previous comparison, this is slightly more walking but less cycling than the previous year, possibly as I have started running this year.

Continue reading “2016 in numbers”

Research update: optimism and pessimism

With about nine months to go until I am due to hand in my thesis, I am periodically cycling between optimism and pessimism as to how I am progressing. I know that I have managed to pull together a reasonably solid body of work, which my supervisors assure me will be sufficient to complete my doctorate. There is still the small matter of finishing this off, and writing it up in a coherent manner, which I know will take time and effort, but I do still have a few months for this.

That said, there is a nagging concern that I’ve not done enough. I have often heard it said that after a Ph.D., one knows everything there is to know about a tiny specialised area of knowledge, having pushed the boundary of human knowledge in a small but measurable way. This feels like the opposite to my research — I have looked at quite a broad range of topics, but covered none of them in that much detail, or so it seems.

As I am working towards an Engineering Doctorate (Eng.D.) it needs to be focused on the requirements of the sponsoring company, and as such producing a portfolio of work is quite normal, as far as I understand. I am also lucky to be based at a new and unique facility, working in a relatively little studied area of marine energy. Therefore it is perhaps easier in some respects to do novel research, as fewer people have already published on similar topics. Conversely, my research doesn’t fit into a well defined gap in existing knowledge, so setting limits on what is and isn’t important becomes more critical in order to produce a coherent piece of work. In the words of Steve Jobs, there’s always “one more thing”.

The insomnia isn’t helping though…